gutsanduppercuts:

Bruce Lee’s test shots for a proposed period piece he had planned. He wanted to make a true kung fu masterpiece but when he asked for an exuberant amount of money for the time, the studio (Shaw Brothers) backed out.

I can only imagine what could have come out of it. Even these still pictures exude a certain air of being very special.

gutsanduppercuts:

Michael Jackson buying a Bruce Lee double-VHS set in Detroit in 1998.
I love the fact that one of the most iconic musicians of our time (if not the most iconic) was a fan of kung fu movies. From buying Bruce Lee flicks to actually visiting the Shaw Brothers studios when he went to Hong Kong. Michael was doing it long before the Rza.

gutsanduppercuts:

Michael Jackson buying a Bruce Lee double-VHS set in Detroit in 1998.

I love the fact that one of the most iconic musicians of our time (if not the most iconic) was a fan of kung fu movies. From buying Bruce Lee flicks to actually visiting the Shaw Brothers studios when he went to Hong Kong. Michael was doing it long before the Rza.

Sharon Tate practicing her Kung-Fu routine with Bruce Lee and Nancy Kwan on the set of The Wrecking Crew (1968)

(via enzantengyou)

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Once Upon A Time In High School
Directed by Yoo Ha
2004 

This was less a martial arts film and more like a two hour episode of The Wonder Years (complete with the cute Korean version of Winnie Cooper). It also had elements of Lindsay Anderson’s If…. with its portrayal of South Korea’s highly strict and militant education system during the 70s.

There are a few fight scenes though, including a Taxi Driver style training montage that culminates to the final rooftop battle. The end result turning into something like a mix between Bruce Lee’s real life rooftop fights when he was in China and the scene in Fist of Legend where Jet Li takes on the whole school.

This might have been my favorite movie if I had seen this in high school during my own Bruce Lee obsession phase, but I just really can’t relate to coming-of-age stuff anymore no matter how many Murakami books I try to read or Freaks and Geeks reruns I watch.

I would recommend this on a purely nostalgic level, if you’re interested in Korea during the 70s, and obviously if you’re a fan of martial arts and Bruce Lee.

When he was 28 years old, Bruce Lee wrote this letter stating his personal goals:
My Definite Chief Aim
I, Bruce Lee, will be the first highest paid Oriental super star in the United States. In return I will give the most exciting performances and render the best of quality in the capacity of an actor. Starting 1970 I will achieve world fame and from then onward till the end of 1980 I will have in my possession $10,000,000. I will live the way I please and achieve inner harmony and happiness.
Bruce Lee Jan. 1969
(via Letters of Note)

When he was 28 years old, Bruce Lee wrote this letter stating his personal goals:

My Definite Chief Aim

I, Bruce Lee, will be the first highest paid Oriental super star in the United States. In return I will give the most exciting performances and render the best of quality in the capacity of an actor. Starting 1970 I will achieve world fame and from then onward till the end of 1980 I will have in my possession $10,000,000. I will live the way I please and achieve inner harmony and happiness.

Bruce Lee
Jan. 1969

(via Letters of Note)

currently watching (Taken with instagram)

currently watching (Taken with instagram)

I clearly need this in my life

Nancy Kwan

b. May 19, 1939

In the pantheon of radical Asians/Asian-Americans in cinema, the two most notable figureheads were Anna May Wong during the silent film era and of course Bruce Lee, who went from TV sidekick to kung-fu movie star in the 1970’s. When Anna May Wong died in 1961, it was fitting that another Asian actress rose to fame around the same time and would serve as the one to pass the torch from the former to the latter.

Nancy Kwan made her debut showcasing her singing and dancing talents in a few Hollywood adaptations of Broadway plays including The World of Suzie Wong and Flower Drum Song. She would then become a fashion icon after being the first to model Vidal Sassoon’s bob haircut for her role in the 1963 film The Wild Affair.

After doing a few more movies as the token hot Asian girl, she eventually starred in the 1968 Dean Martin film The Wrecking Crew, where she met up with another destined Asian-American star: Bruce Lee. Bruce Lee served as the film’s stunt/martial arts coordinator and trained both Nancy and actress Sharon Tate for their fight scenes. Although not amazing by any means (all the Matt Helm movies were like the American Austin Powers basically, or vice versa), the film has historical significance not only with Bruce Lee’s involvement, and Chuck Norris’s first acting role, but was also the last film that Sharon Tate acted in (Manson’d!).

Many many years later, the circle would be complete when Nancy Kwan starred in the Bruce Lee biopic Dragon: The Bruce Lee Story and in 2007, narrated the Anna May Wong documentary Anna May Wong: Frosted Yellow Willows.

more info via nancy-kwan.com

Obligatory Bruce Lee post

Obligatory Bruce Lee post

(via 19o1)

Bruce Lee Presents: How To Properly Make An Exit

*finger-tap to the sunglasses is crucial

Bruce Lee as Metaphor



Fuck your archaic society! I’ma swag out in my three-piece with the Colonel Sanders tie and marry who I want!

"Simplicity is the key to brilliance"
— Bruce Lee

"Simplicity is the key to brilliance"

— Bruce Lee