Over the weekend I thought about how much the film Spring Breakers sort of reminded me of the Hype Williams rap classic Belly down to its themes, neon cinematography, and casting rappers as actors.

I came across two reviews that compared the two films with both reviewers mentioning this exact scene in which Hype Williams gives Harmony Korine a shout out by having DMX put on Gummo after they commit a robbery.

This might also be the best moment in which art house and the rap world have ever converged and we have Hype Williams to thank for that.

[NOTE: I haven’t seen this movie since probably high school but since revisiting it now I think it deserves a lot better rating than the 4.9 it currently has on IMDB]

(Source: nma.tv)

K POP IS THE NEW HEAVY METAL

(via ygfamilyy)

ballershots said: Does Ace Ventura: Pet Detective count as a Florida-representing film? It's located (and filmed) in Miami and Virginia Key, stars Dan Marino, and has Joe Robbie Stadium as a key setting.

OH MAN HOW COULD I FORGET??? My fantasy football team name a few years back was even “Finkel Is Einhorn” after this movie. Agreed 100%.

Another Florida gem is the Errol Morris documentary VERNON, FL about the quirky old people that also take up like half of Florida’s population.

Spring BreakersDirected by Harmony Korine2012
Lately I have been getting nostalgic from meeting and talking to friends old and new this past month who have also moved up north from Florida. This movie sort of came at the right time for me to reflect on what it means to be a product of “The Sunshine State” as well as how its culture is depicted in television and film both past and present.
Having lived in Florida nearly my entire life, including the parts where this film was shot (Clearwater, you are still the worst), it was really good to see St. Pete and Florida in general portrayed in this manner and not like every other movie or TV show set in Miami. Look, I love Scarface, Miami Vice and Billy Corben documentaries as much as the next person, but like, there ARE other cities in Florida you could shoot a movie in. Even the D-movie gem Miami Connection had to rep Miami even though it was filmed and takes place in Orlando. And the only other movies shot near the Tampa Bay area (Edward Scissorhands, The Punisher, the zoo scene in Goodfellas) don’t even really feature the city itself*. So for the (un)fortunate souls who have once or currently do call Florida home, then you will hopefully be pleased that Harmony Korine finally “gets it”.
[*NOTE: I haven’t seen Magic Mike, but realize it takes place in Tampa and is about strippers, another lesser-known Tampa trademark]
One major trait that often gets overlooked in movies and TV shows not named COPS, is that many parts of Florida is still “The South”. The city of Brandon has the largest hanging Confederate flag in all of the U.S. and I can attest to this fact because I used to drive past it when I worked there for a year. In addition to this, the hood parts of Jacksonville, Tallahassee, Orlando, the Tampa/St. Pete area and elsewhere, are basically like a warmer version of The Trap™. Harmony Korine is a genius for casting both Gucci Mane and James Franco as a St. Pete version of RiFF RaFF because their characters personify almost exactly, those two attributes of Florida. Less on the racial tip but more just like, Florida people be crazy kind of thing.
For every beach and perfect sunset and theme park, there’s very much the seedy, trashy side of Florida which are both perfectly captured in this film (also perfectly captured by this tour name and poster and entertaining Twitter account). The same state that birthed the careers of Britney, Christina, Justin Timberlake, Ryan Gosling, and the Backstreet Boys, also gave us Gilbert Arenas, Miami/Booty Bass, Trina, Trick Daddy, and Yo Majesty. This idea of Florida as Paradise Lost or just the concept of losing your innocence in general is illustrated even further in the casting of both Vanessa Hudgens and Selena Gomez. Because like the MMC before them, even Disney Channel alums wild out on spring break. 
Visually, and what I enjoyed the most, was the way the city of St. Pete was shot through the lens of Benoît Debie (Irreversible, Enter The Void). Florida loves bright colors and neon and there’s plenty of it in this movie from its title sequence, to glowing computer screens, and gas station parking lots. The cinematography is essential in setting the eery tone that Harmony Korine plays with throughout the entire film. I once joked that I would like to direct the rap version of Streets of Fire and have it set in Atlanta or Miami in the 90s instead and after seeing this, parts of it was basically that idea come to life. Minus the sledgehammer fight scene.
This movie will give you all kinds of feels both positive and negative. Like his other work, it has Korine’s signature of artfully pushing our buttons and making statements regarding pop culture through ridiculous and comedic ways. But really I am just glad that someone has finally managed to capture a snapshot of present-day Florida in all its crazy glory. This might not mean much to a person from Los Angeles or New York City cause like, ALL THE MOVIES ARE SHOT THERE, but to me I felt a slight sense of pride in seeing the Courtney Campbell Causeway with the sun setting on Tampa Bay in its backdrop on the big screen.

Spring Breakers
Directed by Harmony Korine
2012

Lately I have been getting nostalgic from meeting and talking to friends old and new this past month who have also moved up north from Florida. This movie sort of came at the right time for me to reflect on what it means to be a product of “The Sunshine State” as well as how its culture is depicted in television and film both past and present.

Having lived in Florida nearly my entire life, including the parts where this film was shot (Clearwater, you are still the worst), it was really good to see St. Pete and Florida in general portrayed in this manner and not like every other movie or TV show set in Miami. Look, I love Scarface, Miami Vice and Billy Corben documentaries as much as the next person, but like, there ARE other cities in Florida you could shoot a movie in. Even the D-movie gem Miami Connection had to rep Miami even though it was filmed and takes place in Orlando. And the only other movies shot near the Tampa Bay area (Edward Scissorhands, The Punisher, the zoo scene in Goodfellas) don’t even really feature the city itself*. So for the (un)fortunate souls who have once or currently do call Florida home, then you will hopefully be pleased that Harmony Korine finally “gets it”.

[*NOTE: I haven’t seen Magic Mike, but realize it takes place in Tampa and is about strippers, another lesser-known Tampa trademark]

One major trait that often gets overlooked in movies and TV shows not named COPS, is that many parts of Florida is still “The South”. The city of Brandon has the largest hanging Confederate flag in all of the U.S. and I can attest to this fact because I used to drive past it when I worked there for a year. In addition to this, the hood parts of Jacksonville, Tallahassee, Orlando, the Tampa/St. Pete area and elsewhere, are basically like a warmer version of The Trap™. Harmony Korine is a genius for casting both Gucci Mane and James Franco as a St. Pete version of RiFF RaFF because their characters personify almost exactly, those two attributes of Florida. Less on the racial tip but more just like, Florida people be crazy kind of thing.

For every beach and perfect sunset and theme park, there’s very much the seedy, trashy side of Florida which are both perfectly captured in this film (also perfectly captured by this tour name and poster and entertaining Twitter account). The same state that birthed the careers of Britney, Christina, Justin Timberlake, Ryan Gosling, and the Backstreet Boys, also gave us Gilbert Arenas, Miami/Booty Bass, Trina, Trick Daddy, and Yo Majesty. This idea of Florida as Paradise Lost or just the concept of losing your innocence in general is illustrated even further in the casting of both Vanessa Hudgens and Selena Gomez. Because like the MMC before them, even Disney Channel alums wild out on spring break.

Visually, and what I enjoyed the most, was the way the city of St. Pete was shot through the lens of Benoît Debie (Irreversible, Enter The Void). Florida loves bright colors and neon and there’s plenty of it in this movie from its title sequence, to glowing computer screens, and gas station parking lots. The cinematography is essential in setting the eery tone that Harmony Korine plays with throughout the entire film. I once joked that I would like to direct the rap version of Streets of Fire and have it set in Atlanta or Miami in the 90s instead and after seeing this, parts of it was basically that idea come to life. Minus the sledgehammer fight scene.

This movie will give you all kinds of feels both positive and negative. Like his other work, it has Korine’s signature of artfully pushing our buttons and making statements regarding pop culture through ridiculous and comedic ways. But really I am just glad that someone has finally managed to capture a snapshot of present-day Florida in all its crazy glory. This might not mean much to a person from Los Angeles or New York City cause like, ALL THE MOVIES ARE SHOT THERE, but to me I felt a slight sense of pride in seeing the Courtney Campbell Causeway with the sun setting on Tampa Bay in its backdrop on the big screen.

nbaoffseason:

To quote NBA blogfather Trey Kerby, “There has never been anything more necessary in our lives than this song about J.R. Smith.” Happy Friday, guys.

I think I already know the lyrics to this song because I’ve listened to it like 10 times in a row just now.

NODirected by Pablo Larrain2012
This was a highly fictional but well told story based on the actual ad campaign run by the Chilean opposition to overthrow dictator Augusto Pinochet in 1988. 
Gael Garcia Bernal plays a chill Don Draper type who skateboards around with a rattail and pitches over the top commercials for soda companies during his day job. On the side, he is recruited by a lefty organization to come up with a campaign to encourage Chileans to vote “No” during the 1988 referendum. While still skateboarding around with a rattail. 
The film was also shot in 1:33:1 using 80’s U-Matic cameras so everything looks rather seamless when cutting to actual footage and has a pretty authentic vintage news camera vibe throughout. Which could be a little distracting but fortunately the substance outweighs the style in this case.
Highly recommended if you’re a fan of democracy and political thriller type movies or just vintage ad campaigns. This was also up for Best Foreign Film at this years Academy Awards but I guess people would rather be total downers and watch Michael Haneke films instead.

NO
Directed by Pablo Larrain
2012

This was a highly fictional but well told story based on the actual ad campaign run by the Chilean opposition to overthrow dictator Augusto Pinochet in 1988.

Gael Garcia Bernal plays a chill Don Draper type who skateboards around with a rattail and pitches over the top commercials for soda companies during his day job. On the side, he is recruited by a lefty organization to come up with a campaign to encourage Chileans to vote “No” during the 1988 referendum. While still skateboarding around with a rattail. 

The film was also shot in 1:33:1 using 80’s U-Matic cameras so everything looks rather seamless when cutting to actual footage and has a pretty authentic vintage news camera vibe throughout. Which could be a little distracting but fortunately the substance outweighs the style in this case.

Highly recommended if you’re a fan of democracy and political thriller type movies or just vintage ad campaigns. This was also up for Best Foreign Film at this years Academy Awards but I guess people would rather be total downers and watch Michael Haneke films instead.

(Source: sonyclassics.com)

tamburina:

He looks so proud, bless his heart.

tamburina:

He looks so proud, bless his heart.

(via matequest)

the pinnacle of bathroom graffiti art

the pinnacle of bathroom graffiti art

newmanology:

Black History Month Magazines: Jet, 1960s

Under: Jet

Driven From Within
edited by Mark Vancil

This was a random book find but what sets it apart from other Michael Jordan bios is the focus on the branding aspect including in-depth interviews with Tinker Hatfield on the creation of each shoe. Besides being a huge Nike advertisement, it also features lots of quotes from MJ himself through the years, along with his close friends and family.

Recommended for sneakerheads or those wanting a neatly designed coffee table book on Michael Jordan.

imageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimage

My Crasy Life
Directed by Jean-Pierre Gorin
1992

Part of Criterion’s Eclipse series Three Popular Films by Jean-Pierre Gorin, My Crasy Life is a documentary about the S.O.S. “Sons of Samoa” gang based in Long Beach, CA. 

Prior to his documentaries on Southern California, Gorin was known for collabing with fellow New Wave director Jean-Luc Godard during his radical lefty phase as part of the “Dziga Vertov Group”. Together they put out the film Tout Va Bien starring Jane Fonda, as well as the short film Letter To Jane, where both he and Godard literally just show a photo of Jane Fonda in Vietnam and they talk about it for like an hour. Fortunately, this documentary is nowhere near as pretentious and is pretty much the total opposite.

The documentary itself is a mix of candid interviews, COPS style footage, a bizarre HAL-9000 talking cop car (?) and staged events where the gang cheeses in front of the camera and tries to look like their life is a never-ending Snoop video. There’s even a scene, arguably the best scene, where they’re like 20 deep in a recording studio and then after a few bars go into an a capella of “Teenager In Love" which instantly makes them the most adorable thugs second to this photo of Tupac holding a puppy.

I loved this movie because it does what great documentaries do and that’s shed a light on a particular topic or subject that would normally go unnoticed and captures it in the most vivid of detail. In this case, it takes the subject of 90’s South Central L.A. crips but shows it in the perspective of Samoans in Long Beach. This film also might be the most hood thing Criterion has put out and for that alone, it’s great. It makes me wish that somewhere out there exists a similar artsy documentary on the Freaknik concerts but sadly I don’t think there is.