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Norwegian Wood
Directed by Tran Anh Hung
2010

I am likely the slowest and worst reader ever and haven’t gotten around to reading this book so I can’t speak on how good of an adaptation it was, but even with how slow and boring it got, there were so many good atmospheric shots thanks to the cinematography from Mark Lee Ping Bin. In that sense, it’s comparable to Paul Thomas Anderson’s The Master if you’re into meandering dramas that are shot well, with accompanying drone-y Jonny Greenwood soundtracks.

Scene from Norwegian Wood (2010)

Renoir
Directed by Gilles Bourdos
2012

Before “Manic Pixie Dream Girl” became a trope for socially awkward white dudes in cinema, there was once the artist’s muse. One such muse was Catherine Hessling (born Andrée Heuschling), subject of the later works of renowned French painter Pierre-Auguste Renoir, as well as actress and future wifey of his son, and filmmaker, Jean Renoir.

Less a conventional biopic and more like Art History 101 as told by Terrence Mallick, Gilles Bourdos directs a slow and atmospheric portrait of two different artists: one on the waning end of an already prolific career, and the other who has still yet to discover his life’s passion. The constant: both father and son find their muse in Andrée, a model and aspiring actress sent over to the Renoir household by fellow Impressionist Henri Matisse.

What is particularly good though is the camerawork and cinematography of Mark Lee Ping Bin, who has previously worked with Wong Kar-Wai and Christopher Doyle on In The Mood For Love, as well as the equally atmospheric film adaptation of the Haruki Murakami novel, Norwegian Wood. There are great shots throughout in deep focus and natural lighting, and of trees blowing on the French Riviera, which are very evocative of Renoir’s paintings themselves. And like Renoir, Mark Lee is so good at capturing this beauty in a way only few can.

(Source: Flickr / nd10011)

Found the amazing hold music that I was listening to for like 20 minutes yesterday while on the phone with the Hillsborough County DMV. Turns out it’s the default Cisco CallManager hold music and of course there is an hour long version of it on YouTube. Enjoy.

wandrlust:

Japanese Poster for Alien (Ridley Scott, 1979)

wandrlust:

Japanese Poster for Alien (Ridley Scott, 1979)

(via fiftyfortyninety)

nbaoffseason:

It’s been a crazy week to be living in the Boston area and due to the recent events, the Double Scribble In The Paint art show has been rescheduled to this Friday, April 26th.

I was fortunate enough to catch a glimpse of it this weekend, as well as meeting up with the organizers: Nick of Double Scribble, Ananth and Crystal, and the folks at Voltage Coffee.

Show your love for art and basketball, as well as the city of Boston, and reserve your tickets here: http://www.inthepaintbos.eventbrite.com/

From the event page:

Everything that was planned for last Friday will happen again.

Door donation and raffle proceeds to Shooting Touch, and both Grillos and Downeast Cider will be there with pickles and hard cider galore.

So let’s experience great art (including Aaron Dana’s fantastic mural), eat/drink, and come together In the Paint.

*Note: tickets have sold out but register anyways to get on the list. If not, the artwork will still be up until May 18th. 

**Sidenote: If you want to support another fine Cambridge establishment, all hoops fans are invited to “NBA Nerd Night” every Wednesdays at Parlor Sports in Inman Square for all things basketball nerdery.

(more info: Double Scribble, In The Paint, Voltage Coffee)

Hey this is happening this Friday in Kendall Square in Cambridge, MA.

suicidewatch:

Los Angeles, 1966

egotripland:

Coachella who?Peep the lineup of the Harlem Cultural Festival of 1969
Free Sunday soul concerts at the park? Sponsored by coffee? My generation sucks.

egotripland:

Coachella who?
Peep the lineup of the Harlem Cultural Festival of 1969

Free Sunday soul concerts at the park? Sponsored by coffee? My generation sucks.

From Up On Poppy Hill
Directed by Goro Miyazaki
2011

Latest from Studio Ghibli directed by the son of Hayao Miyazaki, Goro, set in 1963 Yokohama, Japan. Cute movie. The U.S. release has voice acting from Jamie Lee Curtis, Gillian Anderson, Christina Hendricks, Aubrey Plaza, and Ron Howard.

(via shyshounen)

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Belly
Directed by Hype Williams
1998

I rewatched this over the weekend after thinking about Spring Breakers and then coming across this scene on YouTube where Hype Williams gives Harmony Korine a shout by having DMX’s character put on his film Gummo after they pull of a robbery. 

Although there are a few similarities, I wouldn’t necessarily call Spring Breakers, “a female-led remake of Hype Williams’ Belly as directed by Gus Van Sant” as one reviewer puts it. 

I guess you could draw comparisons with Nas’s character Sincere and Selena Gomez’s Faith–both with not-so-subtle names and are looking to find themselves, either in Florida or in Africa–but that’s likely coincidence. Or maybe this was Harmony Korine’s way of nodding back to Hype Williams for the Gummo scene. I’m sure there is a film student out there somewhere just waiting to write an essay comparing Nas to Selena Gomez and this could be your shining moment.

The neon cinematography is also coincidence considering well, ALL Hype Williams videos looked like pre-Gaspar Noe movies anyways. There is also the use of rappers-as-actors and rap music in general, but again, this is a Hype Williams directed movie with a soundtrack on Def Jam so it’s no surprise to have Nas, DMX, and Method Man (and even T-Boz, what up) as the main cast. 

There’s also the great character of Big Head Rico, sort of like a mix between James Franco’s Alien and Gucci Mane, but with pre-Stankonia Andre 3000 perm and a penchant for eating bananas. Who if only had more screen time, would be the much better villain. Actually I wish there would be a spin-off of just Big Head Rico and his crew because he was a pretty great character.

I don’t think there’s a lot to really dive in here but the two films would make for a pretty good double-feature on style/substance and the use of rap culture in cinema. Also Belly, as flawed as it is, seems like the type of movie that’s one film essay and special edition away from belonging in the Criterion Collection.