nbaoffseason:

It’s been a crazy week to be living in the Boston area and due to the recent events, the Double Scribble In The Paint art show has been rescheduled to this Friday, April 26th.

I was fortunate enough to catch a glimpse of it this weekend, as well as meeting up with the organizers: Nick of Double Scribble, Ananth and Crystal, and the folks at Voltage Coffee.

Show your love for art and basketball, as well as the city of Boston, and reserve your tickets here: http://www.inthepaintbos.eventbrite.com/

From the event page:

Everything that was planned for last Friday will happen again.

Door donation and raffle proceeds to Shooting Touch, and both Grillos and Downeast Cider will be there with pickles and hard cider galore.

So let’s experience great art (including Aaron Dana’s fantastic mural), eat/drink, and come together In the Paint.

*Note: tickets have sold out but register anyways to get on the list. If not, the artwork will still be up until May 18th. 

**Sidenote: If you want to support another fine Cambridge establishment, all hoops fans are invited to “NBA Nerd Night” every Wednesdays at Parlor Sports in Inman Square for all things basketball nerdery.

(more info: Double Scribble, In The Paint, Voltage Coffee)

Hey this is happening this Friday in Kendall Square in Cambridge, MA.

suicidewatch:

Los Angeles, 1966

egotripland:

Coachella who?Peep the lineup of the Harlem Cultural Festival of 1969
Free Sunday soul concerts at the park? Sponsored by coffee? My generation sucks.

egotripland:

Coachella who?
Peep the lineup of the Harlem Cultural Festival of 1969

Free Sunday soul concerts at the park? Sponsored by coffee? My generation sucks.

From Up On Poppy Hill
Directed by Goro Miyazaki
2011

Latest from Studio Ghibli directed by the son of Hayao Miyazaki, Goro, set in 1963 Yokohama, Japan. Cute movie. The U.S. release has voice acting from Jamie Lee Curtis, Gillian Anderson, Christina Hendricks, Aubrey Plaza, and Ron Howard.

(via shyshounen)

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

Belly
Directed by Hype Williams
1998

I rewatched this over the weekend after thinking about Spring Breakers and then coming across this scene on YouTube where Hype Williams gives Harmony Korine a shout by having DMX’s character put on his film Gummo after they pull of a robbery. 

Although there are a few similarities, I wouldn’t necessarily call Spring Breakers, “a female-led remake of Hype Williams’ Belly as directed by Gus Van Sant” as one reviewer puts it. 

I guess you could draw comparisons with Nas’s character Sincere and Selena Gomez’s Faith–both with not-so-subtle names and are looking to find themselves, either in Florida or in Africa–but that’s likely coincidence. Or maybe this was Harmony Korine’s way of nodding back to Hype Williams for the Gummo scene. I’m sure there is a film student out there somewhere just waiting to write an essay comparing Nas to Selena Gomez and this could be your shining moment.

The neon cinematography is also coincidence considering well, ALL Hype Williams videos looked like pre-Gaspar Noe movies anyways. There is also the use of rappers-as-actors and rap music in general, but again, this is a Hype Williams directed movie with a soundtrack on Def Jam so it’s no surprise to have Nas, DMX, and Method Man (and even T-Boz, what up) as the main cast. 

There’s also the great character of Big Head Rico, sort of like a mix between James Franco’s Alien and Gucci Mane, but with pre-Stankonia Andre 3000 perm and a penchant for eating bananas. Who if only had more screen time, would be the much better villain. Actually I wish there would be a spin-off of just Big Head Rico and his crew because he was a pretty great character.

I don’t think there’s a lot to really dive in here but the two films would make for a pretty good double-feature on style/substance and the use of rap culture in cinema. Also Belly, as flawed as it is, seems like the type of movie that’s one film essay and special edition away from belonging in the Criterion Collection.

Over the weekend I thought about how much the film Spring Breakers sort of reminded me of the Hype Williams rap classic Belly down to its themes, neon cinematography, and casting rappers as actors.

I came across two reviews that compared the two films with both reviewers mentioning this exact scene in which Hype Williams gives Harmony Korine a shout out by having DMX put on Gummo after they commit a robbery.

This might also be the best moment in which art house and the rap world have ever converged and we have Hype Williams to thank for that.

[NOTE: I haven’t seen this movie since probably high school but since revisiting it now I think it deserves a lot better rating than the 4.9 it currently has on IMDB]

(Source: nma.tv)

K POP IS THE NEW HEAVY METAL

(via ygfamilyy)

ballershots asked: Does Ace Ventura: Pet Detective count as a Florida-representing film? It's located (and filmed) in Miami and Virginia Key, stars Dan Marino, and has Joe Robbie Stadium as a key setting.

OH MAN HOW COULD I FORGET??? My fantasy football team name a few years back was even “Finkel Is Einhorn” after this movie. Agreed 100%.

Another Florida gem is the Errol Morris documentary VERNON, FL about the quirky old people that also take up like half of Florida’s population.

Spring BreakersDirected by Harmony Korine2012
Lately I have been getting nostalgic from meeting and talking to friends old and new this past month who have also moved up north from Florida. This movie sort of came at the right time for me to reflect on what it means to be a product of “The Sunshine State” as well as how its culture is depicted in television and film both past and present.
Having lived in Florida nearly my entire life, including the parts where this film was shot (Clearwater, you are still the worst), it was really good to see St. Pete and Florida in general portrayed in this manner and not like every other movie or TV show set in Miami. Look, I love Scarface, Miami Vice and Billy Corben documentaries as much as the next person, but like, there ARE other cities in Florida you could shoot a movie in. Even the D-movie gem Miami Connection had to rep Miami even though it was filmed and takes place in Orlando. And the only other movies shot near the Tampa Bay area (Edward Scissorhands, The Punisher, the zoo scene in Goodfellas) don’t even really feature the city itself*. So for the (un)fortunate souls who have once or currently do call Florida home, then you will hopefully be pleased that Harmony Korine finally “gets it”.
[*NOTE: I haven’t seen Magic Mike, but realize it takes place in Tampa and is about strippers, another lesser-known Tampa trademark]
One major trait that often gets overlooked in movies and TV shows not named COPS, is that many parts of Florida is still “The South”. The city of Brandon has the largest hanging Confederate flag in all of the U.S. and I can attest to this fact because I used to drive past it when I worked there for a year. In addition to this, the hood parts of Jacksonville, Tallahassee, Orlando, the Tampa/St. Pete area and elsewhere, are basically like a warmer version of The Trap™. Harmony Korine is a genius for casting both Gucci Mane and James Franco as a St. Pete version of RiFF RaFF because their characters personify almost exactly, those two attributes of Florida. Less on the racial tip but more just like, Florida people be crazy kind of thing.
For every beach and perfect sunset and theme park, there’s very much the seedy, trashy side of Florida which are both perfectly captured in this film (also perfectly captured by this tour name and poster and entertaining Twitter account). The same state that birthed the careers of Britney, Christina, Justin Timberlake, Ryan Gosling, and the Backstreet Boys, also gave us Gilbert Arenas, Miami/Booty Bass, Trina, Trick Daddy, and Yo Majesty. This idea of Florida as Paradise Lost or just the concept of losing your innocence in general is illustrated even further in the casting of both Vanessa Hudgens and Selena Gomez. Because like the MMC before them, even Disney Channel alums wild out on spring break. 
Visually, and what I enjoyed the most, was the way the city of St. Pete was shot through the lens of Benoît Debie (Irreversible, Enter The Void). Florida loves bright colors and neon and there’s plenty of it in this movie from its title sequence, to glowing computer screens, and gas station parking lots. The cinematography is essential in setting the eery tone that Harmony Korine plays with throughout the entire film. I once joked that I would like to direct the rap version of Streets of Fire and have it set in Atlanta or Miami in the 90s instead and after seeing this, parts of it was basically that idea come to life. Minus the sledgehammer fight scene.
This movie will give you all kinds of feels both positive and negative. Like his other work, it has Korine’s signature of artfully pushing our buttons and making statements regarding pop culture through ridiculous and comedic ways. But really I am just glad that someone has finally managed to capture a snapshot of present-day Florida in all its crazy glory. This might not mean much to a person from Los Angeles or New York City cause like, ALL THE MOVIES ARE SHOT THERE, but to me I felt a slight sense of pride in seeing the Courtney Campbell Causeway with the sun setting on Tampa Bay in its backdrop on the big screen.

Spring Breakers
Directed by Harmony Korine
2012

Lately I have been getting nostalgic from meeting and talking to friends old and new this past month who have also moved up north from Florida. This movie sort of came at the right time for me to reflect on what it means to be a product of “The Sunshine State” as well as how its culture is depicted in television and film both past and present.

Having lived in Florida nearly my entire life, including the parts where this film was shot (Clearwater, you are still the worst), it was really good to see St. Pete and Florida in general portrayed in this manner and not like every other movie or TV show set in Miami. Look, I love Scarface, Miami Vice and Billy Corben documentaries as much as the next person, but like, there ARE other cities in Florida you could shoot a movie in. Even the D-movie gem Miami Connection had to rep Miami even though it was filmed and takes place in Orlando. And the only other movies shot near the Tampa Bay area (Edward Scissorhands, The Punisher, the zoo scene in Goodfellas) don’t even really feature the city itself*. So for the (un)fortunate souls who have once or currently do call Florida home, then you will hopefully be pleased that Harmony Korine finally “gets it”.

[*NOTE: I haven’t seen Magic Mike, but realize it takes place in Tampa and is about strippers, another lesser-known Tampa trademark]

One major trait that often gets overlooked in movies and TV shows not named COPS, is that many parts of Florida is still “The South”. The city of Brandon has the largest hanging Confederate flag in all of the U.S. and I can attest to this fact because I used to drive past it when I worked there for a year. In addition to this, the hood parts of Jacksonville, Tallahassee, Orlando, the Tampa/St. Pete area and elsewhere, are basically like a warmer version of The Trap™. Harmony Korine is a genius for casting both Gucci Mane and James Franco as a St. Pete version of RiFF RaFF because their characters personify almost exactly, those two attributes of Florida. Less on the racial tip but more just like, Florida people be crazy kind of thing.

For every beach and perfect sunset and theme park, there’s very much the seedy, trashy side of Florida which are both perfectly captured in this film (also perfectly captured by this tour name and poster and entertaining Twitter account). The same state that birthed the careers of Britney, Christina, Justin Timberlake, Ryan Gosling, and the Backstreet Boys, also gave us Gilbert Arenas, Miami/Booty Bass, Trina, Trick Daddy, and Yo Majesty. This idea of Florida as Paradise Lost or just the concept of losing your innocence in general is illustrated even further in the casting of both Vanessa Hudgens and Selena Gomez. Because like the MMC before them, even Disney Channel alums wild out on spring break.

Visually, and what I enjoyed the most, was the way the city of St. Pete was shot through the lens of Benoît Debie (Irreversible, Enter The Void). Florida loves bright colors and neon and there’s plenty of it in this movie from its title sequence, to glowing computer screens, and gas station parking lots. The cinematography is essential in setting the eery tone that Harmony Korine plays with throughout the entire film. I once joked that I would like to direct the rap version of Streets of Fire and have it set in Atlanta or Miami in the 90s instead and after seeing this, parts of it was basically that idea come to life. Minus the sledgehammer fight scene.

This movie will give you all kinds of feels both positive and negative. Like his other work, it has Korine’s signature of artfully pushing our buttons and making statements regarding pop culture through ridiculous and comedic ways. But really I am just glad that someone has finally managed to capture a snapshot of present-day Florida in all its crazy glory. This might not mean much to a person from Los Angeles or New York City cause like, ALL THE MOVIES ARE SHOT THERE, but to me I felt a slight sense of pride in seeing the Courtney Campbell Causeway with the sun setting on Tampa Bay in its backdrop on the big screen.

nbaoffseason:

To quote NBA blogfather Trey Kerby, “There has never been anything more necessary in our lives than this song about J.R. Smith.” Happy Friday, guys.

I think I already know the lyrics to this song because I’ve listened to it like 10 times in a row just now.